Pellon

Case Möllering farm, Germany

Möllering farm (Facebook > Hof Möllering) is a family owned farm located in Lower Saxony, northern Germany in a region called “Emsland”. The main business is potato cultivation and growing of beef cattle.

The farm is managed by owner Wolfgang Möllering, his wife Helga Möllering is taking care of paper work and one employee is working inside barn and at fields. Sometimes there are seasonal employees hired for working by the hour or day at farm.

Möllering is farming at 165 ha and 110 ha of them are leased. They are growing 95 ha potatoes (French fries, potato chips and food potato). 58 ha maize and corn, 5 ha winter rye and 7 ha pasture.

There are 250 places for fattening bulls and 35 female fattening cattle at farm, as well. The marketing of food potatoes and female cattle is straight from farm to end user.

 

In 2012 farmer decided to give up growing of calves, to cut work load peaks and to convert existing places to bull’s barn. They’ve had three options:

  1. Take out everything from existing building and prepare it for trailed mixer wagon.
  2. Demolition and building a new barn.
  3. Optimize inside of building with an automatic feeding system. This system should be able to work on
    120 cm wide feeding tables.

Mr. Möllering decided to take the third option. Together with Pellon he implemented a belt feeding system inside of existing building. Today there is a semiautomatic feeding system with a 12 m³ CutMix vertical mixer. There are 5 feeding tables with different width and length. Altogether there are 11 belts, with a total length of about 200 m, installed. 150 m are for feeding, the others are transport belts. The startup has been in March 2014.

The farmer is filling CutMix once a day with maize and straw. The concentrates are coming straight from silo to mixer, controlled by feeding system. The three feeding times are controlled by Pellon Graphics based on weight and calculated ration.

The working time inside of barn, including supervising, cleaning and loading mixer, is about 45 minutes per day. Once a month Mr. Möllering is doing maintenance like greasing and cleaning motors etc. and this takes about 2,5 hours. In total this are 300 working hours per year.

The system is running without problems. Small things they fixed themselves.

Conclusion after 3 years: Optimal usage of existing building, very quiet bulls because of several feeding times and less physical work.